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2018 National Indigenous Fire Workshop Banner

This year the workshop will be hosted by the local indigenous Mudjingaalbaraga Firesticks team and the Bundanon Trust. This is the 10th workshop and is the first time for the event to leave its birth place of Cape York and travel to honour other communities within the indigenous fire networks. Each year the firesticks network will deliver the workshop to a different state and location to share this privileged event. The aim is to maximise the traditional learning of aboriginal fire knowledge in all the different countries, and the challenges faced in strengthening healthy people and country through fire.

The location this year will be at the Bundanon Trust reserve in the South Coast of New South Wales. This special country is not just a culturally rich environment but is also the artistic home of the well known Australian artist, the late Arthur Boyd. The program will be massive as multiple workshops will be delivered on country where the traditional use of fire has been absent for a very long time. The four day event will be jam packed and will be empowered by a network of Indigenous fire practitioners and supporting experts from all over Australia.

The way we deliver the program is based on indigenous teaching methods so there will be lots of practical demonstrations to give the best experience as possible. Registered participants will be camping at the grounds the whole time and food will be will provided for the whole event. This will ensure that you experience every workshop at the event including attending the demonstration burns. For people who can’t attend the whole workshop, there will be an opportunity to attend the last day of the event at a small cost. The open day will include presentations, discussions, workshops, films, and amazing artists interpreting the country and fire through a range of mediums. If that is not enough then you may just network with some amazing people who may just be able to enlighten your own aspirations. However you will not be able to experience all the workshops on the open day as it will be a different program to the official earlier workshops. Either way, this year is going to be something too good to miss. Register now to avoid disappointment.

Important Dates:

April 31 | Early Bird special ends

June 30 | Standard tickets end

Tickets will remain availabe until July 7, however they will incur a late fee.

Tickets can be purchased at https://capeyorkfire.com.au/2018-workshops/national-indigenous-fire-workshop-nsw

 

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