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South-east Australia Aboriginal Fire Forum - Link to purchase tickets

Description

We are pleased to announce the inaugural South-east Australia Aboriginal Fire Forum to be hosted by ACT Natural Resource Management (ACT NRM) and ACT Parks and Conservation Service (ACT PCS).

The Forum, titled Cultural Burning: Evolving with community and Country, will give participants the opportunity to network, learn, and establish collaborations with others committed to cultural burning and caring for Country. The Forum will be held on Ngunnawal Country at the Ann Harding Centre, University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT from Thursday 10 to Friday 11 May 2018 and will be followed by a demonstration field day on Saturday 12 May 2018. Keynote speakers include:

  • Bruce Pascoe—author and historian.
  • Dean Freeman—ACT Fire Management Unit.
  • Oliver Costello—Firesticks.
  • Terrence Taylor—Jigija Indigenous Fire Training Program.
  • Victor Steffensen—Mulong Indigenous Fire Management.

To help celebrate the Forum we invite you to attend a networking dinner hosted by Steven Oliver on the evening of 10 May 2018.

Registrations to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members are free. Please note that spaces are limited and are aimed at those who are available to attend the whole three days.

Program Overview

9 am – 5 pm, Thursday 10 May

  • Presentations
  • Panel discussions
  • Forum Dinner

9 am – 5 pm, Friday 11 May:

  • Presentations
  • Panel discussions
  • Breakout session

Saturday, Saturday 12 May

  • Field trip on Country

Date and Time

Thursday 10th May 2018 (8:00 am) to Saturday 12th May 2018 (5:00 pm) AEST

Location

Ann Harding Conference Centre, University of Canberra

24 University Drive South

Bruce, ACT 2617

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