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Arnhem Land – Aboriginal fire ecologist, Dean Yibarbuk, explains how traditional fire management practices have kept the country healthy for thousands of years. Recently, his mob have been working with local scientists to adapt the regime of traditional fire management to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The fire abatement scheme of Australia’s Western Arnhemland is a carbon offset community programme, gaining a lot of international attention.

Made in association with Kim McKenzie of Australian National University and Wardakken

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