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IMAGE: A cool burn under way near Orange, NSW (Photo: David Rutledge)

Burning the bush to prevent catastrophic fires is something that rural fire services all over the country have been doing for decades. But Aboriginal Australians have been doing it for tens of thousands of years—and their “cool burns” are making a welcome comeback.

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