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The RFSA is to be congratulated in the continued support of volunteer firefighter, Michelle McKemey of Guyra Rural Fire Brigade, assisting her PhD research project, Cultural Burning: Using Indigenous practice and science to apply fire strategically.

Let’s not forget the hard work of Michelle, well done and keep up the good work.

Michelle started her PhD in 2014, her study involves investigation into fire ecology and empowering land managers to apply fire as a management tool.

Working with Bambai Indigenous rangers, Michelle is examining Indigenous cultural knowledge associated with fire management, as well as, conducting ecological experiments to improve understanding of fire on the landscape.

A short film detailing Michelle’s research has recently been published by the University of New England and her research group was awarded the CSIRO DNFC (Digital National Facilities and Collections) award for Indigenous Engagement.  The RFSA is pleased to support Michelle’s valuable research.

Note: You can view this article on the RFSA web site if you prefer.

Watch Short Film: https://www.facebook.com/uneenvironment/videos/560244737674297/

Michelle undertaking ecological monitoring

Michelle undertaking ecological monitoring

Guyra Rural Fire Brigade pictured with Bambai Indigenous Rangers

Guyra Rural Fire Brigade pictured with Bambai Indigenous Rangers

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